Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools?

  • 52 Pages
  • 2.84 MB
  • 3838 Downloads
  • English
by
National Bureau of Economic Research , Cambridge, Mass
School improvement programs -- Florida, Educational vouchers -- Fl
StatementDavid N. Figlio, Cecilia Elena Rouse.
SeriesNBER working paper paper series -- no. 11597., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 11597.
ContributionsRouse, Cecilia Elena., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination52 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17627889M
OCLC/WorldCa61840530

David Figlio & Cecilia E, Rouse, "Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?," Working Papers 14, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section. Get this from a library. Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools?.

[David N Figlio; Cecilia Elena Rouse; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- "In this paper we study the effects of the threat of school vouchers and school stigma in Florida on the performance of "low-performing" schools using student-level data from a subset of districts.

David Figlio & Cecilia E, Rouse, "Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?," Working Papers 14, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section.

David N. Figlio & Cecilia Rouse, "Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools. Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools. [An article from: Journal of Public Economics] [D.N. Figlio, C.E. Rouse] on dam-projects.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This digital document is a journal article from Journal of Public Economics, published by Elsevier in. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your dam-projects.com Media Library Author: D.N. Figlio, C.E. Rouse. Stigma and school voucher threats under a revised Florida accountability law have positive impacts on student performance.

Stigma and public school choice threats under the U.S. federal accountability law, No Child Left Behind, do not have similar effects in Florida. Significant impacts of stigma, when combined with the voucher threat, are. The first is the use of test-based performance indicators, followed by sanctions for low-performing schools.

The second alternative uses market forces to reward some schools and punish others as parents and students make personal resource-allocation decisions through the use of vouchers. Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low. Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools.

How low-performing schools respond to voucher and accountability pressure. Book Chapter. Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools? book longer separate, not yet equal: Race and class in elite college admission and campus life. Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools.

Journal of Public Economics 90() Figlio, D., and Winicki, J. Food for thought. The effects of school accountability plans on school nutrition. Journal of Public Economics 89() Flores-Lagunes, A., and Light, A. Jul 17,  · Figlio, David, and Cecilia Rouse. “Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?” Journal of Public Economics 90(1–2)– Google Scholar.

Greene, Jay. An Evaluation of the Florida A-Plus Accountability and School Choice Program. New York: Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. Google ScholarCited by: Demands for more accountability and results-based incentive systems in K education come from many directions and currently dominate much of the education policy discussion at both the state and federal levels in the United States (Ladd, ; Ladd & Hansen, ) and abroad (Burgess, Propper, Slater, & Wilson, ).Cited by: 1.

Dec 06,  · Abstract. The current focus on systemic reform in K education in many countries around the globe began to develop in the early s, in response to frustration with the low performance of some schools on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and other international assessments, compared to those in high performing countries, and also in response to widening Cited by: 2.

Incentives and Student Learning I I. Do accountability and voucher. threats improve low-performing schools. Journal of Public Eco-nomics, School accountability: can we reward schools and avoid pupil selection.

score is particularly important for their schools' accountability rating. and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing.

Details Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools? FB2

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. “Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?” Journal of Public Economics 90, no. (Jan. ), p. Figlio, David, and Krzysztof Karbownik, “Evaluation of Ohio’s EdChoice Scholarship Program,” Fordham Institute, July How does school choice affect public schools.

The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice dam-projects.com Sound research has demonstrated consistently that school choice policies improve public school performance. More than 20 credible studies indicate school choice programs introduce more competition among all public and private schools.

Oct 11,  · Abstract. School choice has expanded significantly in the past couple of decades and is likely to continue doing so.

Rigorous research has informed our understanding of the impact of school choice options on student achievement, attainment, and family dam-projects.com by: 1. In addition to offering important information for states, Systems for State Science Assessment provides policy makers, local schools, teachers, scientists, and parents with a broad view of the role of testing and assessment in science education.

Description Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools? FB2

Oct 01,  · AbstractWe exploit a natural experiment to test whether school closure threats can increase staff effort and improve performance. The Hong Kong government overestimated postHandover mainland Chinese immigration and local births, creating excess capacity in many school districts.

Inwith student enrollment falling to new lows (increasing cost per student), the Author: Chiu Ming Ming, Joh Sung Wook, Khoo Lawrence. Education and Economic Development. Payne Hall. Tuesday and Thursday 1 – PM [electronic book; skim through sections on “Raising revenues fairly and efficiently” in Part I and all of Part II, “Fairness and productivity in school finance”] Do accountability and voucher threats improve low-performing schools.

Journal of. The programs also rest on a shaky legal foundation because of the state’s Blaine Amendment and constitutional provisions for “public” and “uniform” schools.

The authors conclude that state-level voucher programs in Florida and other states are on uncertain political and legal dam-projects.com by: Florida’s school voucher program (and the proposals recently rejected in Texas and Michigan) also caps the value of vouchers to well below the per pupil costs of public schooling.

And it aims to improve only those schools the government deems to be the worst—and to push them above some minimum standard, not to improve the quality of all. Book Review – THE CURRENT NAME OF TEACHER´S DISCONTENTS This may not depend on the urgency of achieving goals established for principals and/or schools by school accountability policies.

“Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?” Journal of Public Economics, 90(): A similar question exists in the literature on accountability programs. With the expansion of school choice, targeted stigma and school voucher threats are widely used by policy makers to motivate schools to improve academic achievement.

These programs label schools as low-performing. School Vouchers Do NOT Improve Student Achievement theory that giving parents more choices regarding where to educate their children creates competition and thus improves low-performing schools.

(Charter schools, though technically funded and regulated similarly to public schools, are another key private school component of the choice Author: Ted Mclaughlin.

Jan 31,  · In Arizona, Save our Schools Arizona greatest achievements of were: defeated 5 voucher expansion bills, increased fiscal transparency for vouchers via legislation, they collaborated with other education groups to gain tens of millions more in public education funding in the state budget, presented their informative Education Roadshow to.

Nov 24,  · Borsuk: 6 takeaways from latest school report cards. The school report cards issued by the state Department of Public Instruction on Tuesday. He’s sure he has the solution for all that ails New York’s schools, and he is not shy about sharing.

Last Thursday, he told an MIT conference audience how to quickly improve public schools. “I would, if I had the ability – which nobody does really – to just design a system and say, ‘ex cathedra, this is.

• More than 80 percent of states made turning around low-performing schools a high priority, but at least 50 percent found it very difficult to turn around low-performing schools. • 38 states (76 percent) reported significant gaps in expertise for supporting school turnaround inand that number increased to 40 (80 percent) in In the state of Texas charter schools are public schools that operate via contracts with an authorizer such as local school district authorizers or the state authorizing office.

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The Texas Charter Authorizing Office oversees the state's charter portfolio. Vision and Mission Our vision is to. This book explores how to improve estimates of charter schools' performance and suggests how policymakers can learn more about charter schools and make better use of evidence. The Charter School Catch April, Paul Hill, Robin Lake.Thus, despite the theoretical prediction that school accountability systems will improve student achievement—at least for certain segments of the school population—such gains are not a foregone conclusion.

In some cases schools may focus on test scores to the exclusion of transferable knowledge or may end up with less funding for instruction.Mar 31,  · Comments.

Welcome to our new and improved comments, which are for subscribers dam-projects.com is a test to see whether we can improve the experience Author: Susan Spicka.